Archive for the ‘Advice for New Writers’ Category

Guest Post: The Work of Writing

by Theodora Goss

I keep reading blog posts that basically all make the same point: anyone can find time to write. You’ve probably read them too. The message is, if you want to be a writer, you can find the time. Get up early and write before work. Write on your lunch break. Write on your commute home. Write after everyone else is asleep. If you can write even a hundred words a day, eventually you’ll have a novel.

It’s not a bad message, but it’s aimed toward aspiring writers. And aspiring writers, I would argue, are very different from working writers, who are different, again, from professional writers.

April Market Report

Welcome to the April Market Report for SF/F. Deadlines and Closures to Note: Alfa Eridiani (Spain) has ceased publication. Gypsy Shadow Publishing, Unlikely Story, and Urban Fantasy Magazine are closed to new submissions until further notice. Hyperpulp (Brazil) has not released an issue since 2012. Intercom-SF (Italy) is currently not publishing. Jupiter Gardens Press is closed to […]

Story Cake

by Sylvia Spruck Wrigley

The popular advice for writers is to write your first draft for just one person and then to revise for the world. Your voice, they say, should be personal and true and deep but the story itself must have mass-market appeal. This is a rainbow I chased for a long time. Lately, though, I’m starting to question the simple assumption that success is measured by the number of readers.

Ask the Tax Czarina: 1099-MISC

So far, SFWA’s own “Tax Czarina” has discussed basic tax issues writers face and questions about bartering.  This week, she focuses on questions regarding Form 1099 MISC. Q: Did I miss the deadline for Form 1099-MISC? What should I do? A: The deadline for delivering Form 1099-MISC was February 1. So you may have missed that deadline. The deadline for filing […]

We Are All Allies

by Dan Koboldt

In some ways, publishing is a zero-sum game. There are only so many slots in the schedule of traditional publishers. Only ten books can occupy the top ten list, and only one can win the Hugo. Yet the most dangerous and pervasive threat to the aspiring author is not another author, nor is it a big bad publisher. Nor is it a certain online store. No, the biggest threat is the ever-shrinking reading time the average person has in our modern world.