International Sir Terry Pratchett Day

THE INTERNATIONAL AUTHORS FORUM LAUNCHES
INTERNATIONAL SIR TERRY PRATCHETT DAY AT LBF

To celebrate Sir Terry Pratchett as The London Book Fair’s (LBF) Author of the Day on Tuesday 8 April, the International Authors Forum, in association with LBF, has designated Tuesday 8 April International Sir Terry Pratchett Day, to mark his phenomenal international publishing success.   To launch the day, authors from around the world will be asked to vote for their favourite character from one of his books choosing from a list of Sir Terry’s Official Top 10 Favourites, which are:

  1. Commander Vimes
  2. Death
  3. Granny Weatherwax
  4. Tiffany Aching
  5. Lord Vetinari
  6. The Librarian
  7. Nanny Ogg
  8. Rincewind
  9. The Nac Mac Feegle
  10. Willikins

The London Book Fair is also encouraging Sir Terry’s fans around the world to vote and tweet. 

Katie Webb, International Authors Forum, said: “Sir Terry Pratchett is a huge source of pride amongst the global author community. His innumerable achievements and dedication to his craft – unlocking imaginations, giving entertainment, education and wonder to so many – are testament to the value of the author in society. We are honoured to be celebrating Sir Terry Pratchett, and to be spreading the celebration worldwide.”

Sir Terry Pratchett said: “An International Terry Pratchett Day?  I have a day?  A vote?  I will celebrate with a tincture poured by Willikins…I urge you to do the same – by voting for your favourite character.  Log on to www.londonbookfair.co.uk/sirtpday to find out mine.”

Sir Terry Pratchett, one of the pre-eminent voices in contemporary British fiction has sold more than 85 million books in 37 languages. Across more than 40 Discworld novels, numerous books for children and his latest Parallel Earth series written in collaboration with Stephen Baxter, Sir Terry has won millions of fans worldwide with a voice that balances humour with an intelligent and deeply human vision of the world.  Knighted for services to literature in 2009, Sir Terry’s work has won many prestigious awards including The Carnegie Medal, Nebulas Awards and Locus Awards.

 

TO REGISTER YOUR VOTE

To vote for your favourite Sir Terry Pratchett character, please go to:
www.londonbookfair.co.uk/sirtpday
Twitter:  #intSirTPday

 WIN EXCLUSIVE SIGNED COPIES!

All those who register their vote and tweet for their favourite character will be
entered in to a prize draw to win a signed copy of one of Sir Terry’s books. 

••• 

For further information, please contact Tracey Jennings, Midas PR
Tel:  020 7361 7860, email: tracey.jennings@midaspr.co.uk.

www.londonbookfair.co.uk

One Response

  1. Ted Bruning

    I wrote this in Sir Terry’s honour. I hope he likes it.

    A Chance Encounter

    I met Death yesterday; I shook his bony hand.
    He grinned and asked: “HOW ARE YOU?” I said: “Grand.
    “No murrain, pox, nor plague – not even flu…”
    He said: “DON’T BE AFRAID: I HAVEN’T COME FOR YOU.”

    “Afraid?” says I; “Afraid of you? Not I!
    Believe me, pal, I’m not afraid to die.
    Days come and go, and one will be my last.
    Until then, hey, I’m havin’ me a blast.

    “Oh yes! In freezing spring I plough the clay.
    Knee-deep in mud and soaking wet, all day
    I plod along behind a horse’s arse.
    As entertainment goes, mate, that is class.

    “Then comes the summer, and the hay –
    All good health-giving exercise, they say:
    First I mow until my arms are dead;
    Then I pitch, with shoulders turned to lead,

    “Till darkness ends a day that’s been a bastard
    And all the farmhands go off to get plastered.
    Not so smart, my friends, because what’s worse:
    Next morning’s headache, or this evening’s thirst?”

    “I KNEW,” said Death, “YOU HAD A HARD LIFE, GRANTED,
    BUT I NEVER GUESSED YOU WERE SO DISENCHANTED.
    DOES NOTHING MAKE YOUR GRINDING TOIL WORTHWHILE?
    A LEAFY GLADE, A BROOK, A COUNTRY STILE?

    “MOUNDS OF GOLDEN GRAIN, AND ALL THAT STUFF –
    ARE HARVEST AND ITS BOUNTY NOT ENOUGH?”
    At this point I gave up. “Death, don’t you see?”
    I told him, “Look! I’m 43,

    “I’ve worked so hard I’m worn down to a stub.
    And what’s it all been for? Aye, there’s the rub:
    Who is it gets the profit of our labours?
    Not me, I tell you, nor my friends and neighbours.

    “You won’t see me, or any peasant farmer
    Prancing about in shiny suits of armour
    Waving swords or great big battle-axes –
    Although they’re paid for by our bloody taxes.

    “I’m fed up, frankly, trying to make ends meet,
    And when I saw you strolling down the street
    I sort of hoped, and not unnaturally,
    That it was time, and you were here for me.”

    Death grinned (he always does) and shook his head.
    “ALAS, YOU’RE NOT DOWN FOR TODAY,” he said.
    BUT IF YOU FEEL SO STRONGLY THAT IT’S TIME
    MIGHT I SUGGEST THAT YOU RESORT TO CRIME?

    “YOU KNOW THE LAW ROUND HERE IS ALWAYS WILLING
    TO STRETCH YOUR NECK FOR POCKETING A SHILLING.
    NICK SOMETHING NOW, MY FRIEND: I GUARANTEE
    THEY’LL HAVE YOU ON DEATH ROW IN TIME FOR TEA.”

    You wouldn’t think that Death was such a kidder,
    But I thanked him for the tip, which I’d consider.
    And just before we parted, I enquired
    Who was the luckless fellow who’d expired?

    “OH, NO-ONE MUCH,” he said. “SOME TIGHT-ARSED EARL
    WILL GET ACROSS AN ULTRA-STROPPY CHURL.
    THE PEASANT’S HAD ENOUGH OF PAYING TAX:
    HE’LL TAKE A SPADE AND GIVE HIM FORTY WHACKS.

    “I’LL BE THERE TO CATCH HIM WHEN HE FALLS
    AND LEAD HIM TO THE WARRIORS’ TIMELESS HALLS.
    THE BLOKE WHO DID IT SWINGS, AND PRETTY SOON –
    I’M DUE BACK HERE TOMORROW AFTERNOON.”

    “This Earl,” said I, “You wouldn’t know his name?
    Not my master, is it?” “AYE, THE SAME.”
    “High time,” said I, “that grasping git got paid.
    Hang on – I’m just off home to fetch my spade.”