SELF-PUBLISHING

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Overview: The Evolution of Self-Publishing
Print Self-Publishing
Electronic Self-Publishing
Self-Publishing or Traditional Publishing?
Bad Reasons to Choose Self-Publishing
Cautions
Links

Overview: The Evolution of Self-Publishing *

Until relatively recently, if you wanted to self-publish, you faced a labor-intensive and costly process.

You had to handle every aspect of producing your book yourself, including hiring and overseeing editor(s), designer, cover artist, and printer. You had to order a print run, which meant you also needed somewhere to store a lot of boxes. Then, at the end of all that work and expense, you had to find a way to get your book into readers’ hands—an uphill struggle, since bookstore and library distribution wasn’t available to individual authors, and paid publishing carried a powerful stigma.

Except for authors who had direct access to a niche audience, or were extraordinarily talented promoters, or simply caught a lucky break, it was a rare self-publisher who ever came close to recouping his or her investment.

Things began to change in the mid-1990’s, with the appearance of the first Internet-based self-publishing services. These took advantage of a new digital technology called print-on-demand, which eliminated the necessity of traditional high-volume print runs by making it possible for books to be produced one at a time or in small lots.

The new self-publishing services were simple: all you had to do was upload your manuscript, choose an interior format and a cover, and the service turned your book into a digital file that could be printed and bound when ordered and never had to be stored or warehoused. They were also inexpensive–since the entire process was automated, and production costs could be recouped at the point of sale, the services could keep fees low and still make a profit.

The resulting books were flimsy and cheap-looking—as I recall, books from Xlibris, one of the earliest print-on-demand self-publishing services, didn’t even have cover images—and available only from the services’ websites. Building a readership did not become easier—bookstores were no more interested than before in shelving pay-to-publish books, especially when those books didn’t carry standard wholesale discounts and weren’t returnable. But for the first time ever, authors could self-publish with relative ease and at minimal cost.

Through the late 1990’s and into the early years of the new century, self-publishing services continued to evolve. Distribution expanded to include online retailers such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Many services added an ebook option–though ebooks, then, were a niche market with very limited readership, and print was still self-publishers’ primary focus. Other options expanded as well—not always to authors’ benefit, as the services realized they could make a huge profit by offering premium-priced (and dubiously effective) marketing services. Fees ballooned: some services were still cheap, and a tiny few were free, but others offered packages costing nearly as much as the old-fashioned vanity publishers.

What didn’t change: the challenge of discoverability. The pay-to-publish stigma was still alive and well–and together with high cover prices (print-on-demand is an expensive production method, and POD books must be priced higher in order to make a profit) and limited distribution (online only, with little or no shelf presence), the average self-publisher was lucky to make more than a few hundred sales over the lifetime of his or her book.

Then, in 2007, Amazon introduced the Kindle, and with it, the first exclusively electronic self-publishing platform: Kindle Direct Publishing. KDP offered a new self-publishing model: it was ebook only; it was free; and it granted self-publishers control over the pricing of their books. Even more important, it gave them access to the exact same distribution channels as traditional publishers. Self-publishers could now launch their books into a marketplace where the two biggest shortcomings of print self-publishing—high cover prices and sharply limited availability—simply didn’t exist.

Of course, none of this would have mattered much if ebooks had remained the tiny, enthusiast-only market that they were pre-Kindle. But as we all know, the Kindle was the tipping point. Ebooks took off—and electronic self-publishing with them.

Self-publishing hasn’t become easy. It’s still a very difficult, demanding way to go. As with traditional publishing, major success is still an outlier event. But for the savvy, motivated author, it is now a viable alternative career choice. Today’s self-publishers are building audiences and making money; they’re receiving traditional publishing offers—and sometimes refusing them—and crafting innovative distribution and subsidiary rights deals. Self-published books represent a commanding portion of sales in certain ebook markets, particularly genre fiction. The successful self-published author can no longer be dismissed as a fluke.

There are still many pitfalls and “bewares,” however—some arising from technological and logistical issues, and others, paradoxically, from self-publishing’s explosive popularity. The sections that follow address these.

* The above is excerpted from my Introduction to Choosing a Self-Publishing Service.

Print Self-Publishing

A rising tide does not necessarily lift all boats. The runaway success of electronic self-publishing has not been duplicated for print self-publishing—mainly because no one has figured out how to overcome the twin challenges of price and distribution.

Many self-publishers are choosing to forgo print entirely and publish only in ebook form. But there are still good reasons to self-publish in print (though never only in print):

- To give readers alternatives. The more formats you can offer, the more readers you can satisfy.

- To exploit real-world sales opportunities, if you’ve got them. You may have a way of selling directly to your audience (a restauranteur who wants to make a cookbook available to his or her customers, for instance), or of exploiting “back of the room” situations (someone who lectures or conducts workshops and can sell books at these occasions).

The easiest–and potentially least expensive–route to print self-publishing is through one of the many print-on-demand-based self-publishing services. There are a number of issues to consider with these.

Cost

The best print self-publishing services are free, or cost no more than a few hundred dollars. Others are much, much more expensive. What you get for those very large amounts of money may not be worth what you’re paying—especially considering the issues outlined below.

Real-world presence

Many authors choose to self-publish in print because they hope to gain brick-and-mortar bookstore and/or library presence. However, limited distribution and nonstandard sales practices make that unlikely.

Most self-publishing services claim to provide “worldwide distribution”–and generally they do, through wholesalers such as Ingram, Baker & Taylor, and Bertram. But wholesalers are only half the distribution picture. The other half is a distributor with a sales team that sells books directly into bookstores and libraries. (For a more detailed discussion of the differences between wholesalers and distributors, see this post from Writer Beware’s blog.)

Without that direct sales component, libraries and booksellers will never know your book exists, unless you tell them yourself. This is a frequent source of disappointment for authors, who often assume that wholesale distribution equals bookstore presence.

Another reason booksellers may not want to deal with print self-published books: by long tradition, they’re accustomed to a particular set of buying protocols, which include discounts of 40% or more, 60- or 90-day billing, and full returnability. Many print self-publishing services don’t offer industry-standard discounts, and most require that orders be pre-paid. And while some services do offer returnability if you pay an extra fee, it may be a restrictive policy that booksellers won’t find attractive.

Libraries may be willing to accept donations of books, especially from local authors, and authors who are willing to go door-to-door can be successful in persuading local bookstores to stock their books (though usually they must sell on consignment, or agree to buy back unsold copies). Some bookstores have special programs for self-published authors (though there may be a fee for service). By and large, however, self-published print books don’t see the inside of bookstores or libraries.

Pricing

Self-publishing services use print-on-demand technology to produce books (POD allows books to be printed one at a time or in small lots, rather than in larger print runs of several hundred or several thousand). Because it can’t take advantage of economies of scale, POD is a more expensive printing process than traditional offset printing.

Self-publishing services recoup their production costs and overhead at the point of sale by including them in a book’s retail price. The more material it takes to produce the book, the more expensive it will be; at longer page counts, POD-produced books can cost more than twice as much as their offset-printed counterparts. Even where the author (rather than the service) determines the retail price, they must do so on top of a fixed production cost. In other words, your self-published print book may cost more–possibly a lot more–than a similar book from a traditional publisher. A price tag of $25 or $30 for a trade paperback-size book is a major disincentive for readers.

Physical quality

POD-produced books can be almost indistinguishable from traditionally-printed trade paperbacks. But some self-publishing services skimp on paper and cover stock, and don’t pay enough attention to production standards. Books from these companies can be shoddy in appearance, with covers that curl and pages that fall out as you’re reading them (a good reason to order a book or two from any self-publishing service you’re thinking of using). Also, POD-produced books are often bound with a narrow spine, so that they look more like pamphlets than books.

Low Sales

For most authors, the corollary of all of the above is low sales. It’s estimated that the average self-published print book sells around 250 copies over its lifetime (for a look at some old but still meaningful statistics, see here). This may not matter much to self-publishers who are focusing primarily on ebooks, and making print books available only as an adjunct. But if you’re self-publishing in print, you need to be aware that ebooks will likely be your main source of sales.

Electronic Self-Publishing

There are a number of options for electronic self-publishing.

- Direct to device. Amazon makes it possible (and free) to self-publish to the Kindle via Kindle Direct Publishing. Also free is Barnes & Noble’s Nook Press and Kobo’s Kobo Writing Life.

- Epublishing distributors or aggregators. These services allow you to publish simultaneously to a variety of platforms, and will often provide conversion and formatting as well. The best ones charge no upfront fees, making their money by taking a cut of your earnings. Smashwords and Bookbaby are two examples.

Self-publishing services. Many self-publishing services offer electronic publishing across a variety of platforms, usually in tandem with print self-publishing. The downside is an often-hefty fee and less flexibility and control.

Issues to consider:

Epub only, or epub plus print?

As noted above, publishing a print book as well as an ebook gives readers alternatives, and that’s always a good thing. Even so, many authors choose to forgo what’s typically a low-selling option for self-publishers, and publish exclusively in ebook form. There’s no right or wrong here—but it is something you need to think about.

Platform or package?

If you decide to go with both an ebook and a pbook, should you publish them individually to separate platforms (for example, ebook to Smashwords and KDP, pbook to CreateSpace), or buy a self-publishing package that will produce both formats for you? Publishing to separate platforms is more work but gives you far more control; buying a package may be easier but can be expensive (see the Cautions section, below). Again, there’s no right or wrong, but you do need to carefully investigate your options.

Cost

You don’t have to spend money to self-publish electronically. The best electronic self-publishing platforms are free.

To be competitive, however, more and more self-publishers are choosing to invest in editing, design, cover art, and publicity—harkening back to the old days of self-publishing, where entrepreneurial authors really did serve as their own publishers. Hiring freelancers likely won’t cost you anything like the inflated fees charged by self-publishing services—but for a truly professional-reading and -looking book, you do need to factor in some expense. (Hiring freelancers is an area in which you really need to be careful. See the Cautions section, below.)

Terms and Conditions

Any electronic self-publishing service or platform will have Terms and Conditions or Terms of Use to which you must agree in order to use the service. Be sure to read these carefully—and make sure you understand them. They typically give the platform sweeping control over your books and your account—including the right to delete your books or your account, or both, for violation of often vaguely-stated content guidelines—and the right to make changes at will, including changes in payment terms.

Some examples: the Great Erotica Panic of 2013, in which Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other retailers deleted hundreds of self-published ebooks over content guideline violations; and Amazon’s recent reduction in royalty rates for self-published audiobooks.

Format and Genre

For most authors, self-publishing success depends heavily on what kinds of books they write, as well as the number of books they have on offer and how fast they can produce them.

For instance, this chart from Hugh Howey’s Author Earnings Report indicates that on Amazon (which commands by far the largest share of the self-publishing market), romance, science fiction/fantasy, and general nonfiction–in that order–bring in the most revenue for self-publishers, with mystery/thriller/suspense close behind. Children’s books and literary fiction, by contrast, hardly register.

And according to Smashwords, one of the biggest of the ebook distributors, longer books have the advantage over shorter ones, series books outsell standalones, and a big catalog confers a significant advantage.

See also this analysis of a 2012 survey of self-published authors–there’s some very interesting information here about who self-publishes, how they do it, and what makes them successful.

Competition

The explosive success of electronic self-publishing has attracted legions of authors, creating an intensely crowded marketplace where it’s harder than ever to stand out. Be aware that you’re launching yourself into a crowded and highly competitive field.

Self-Publishing or Traditional Publishing?

Whether to self-publish or publish traditionally is currently the most polarized area of discussion in all of publishing.

Many self-publishing advocates portray traditional publishing as backward, elitist, and abusive. Traditional publishers, they say, hold writers’ rights captive and add no value beyond, possibly, print distribution (and print is so 20th century). Self-publishing, on the other hand, is at the forefront of digital innovation, offers unlimited freedom and control, and pays better (at least, on a per-book basis). Self-publishing is the best way to start a writing career, regardless of what kind of writer you are or what kinds of books you write.

In the traditional publishing community, there are still those who see self-publishing as a gigantic slush pile, a realm of narcissistic losers unleashing a tsunami of bad writing on the world. They decry the cheapening of literature and the loss of traditional values. They dismiss self-publishing successes as flukes and outliers.

These highly biased views miss the point of the self-publishing revolution—that writers now have options.Where once upon a time it was traditional publishing or nothing, now there are multiple paths to publication and success. The great thing about being an author in the twenty-first century is that you get to choose.

Both self-publishing and traditional publishing offer benefits and disadvantages. Which is best for you depends on your needs and goals. They’re also not mutually exclusive–plenty of authors are choosing to become hybrids, self-publishing some books and traditionally publishing others.

Some tips for making this very important decision–especially for first-time authors:

- Understand your options. Invest some time in learning and research, to make sure that you have a solid basic knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of both self-publishing and traditional publishing. Unless you are familiar with the whole range of options available to you, you can’t truly make an informed decision.

- Think about what kind of writer you are. What you write, how you write, and where you are in your writing journey all should factor into your choice. For instance, are you prolific or slow? Self-publishing can be a good choice for prolific writers, but is less certain for slow ones. Do you write genre fiction or literary fiction? Self-publishing can work well for genre writers, but for literary fiction, the traditional publishing route may be a better way to go.

- Decide how comfortable you are with DIY. Successful self-publishing is entrepreneurship. It’s also a lot of work: self-publishers must not only do everything an author does, they must do everything a publisher does. For authors who like being their own bosses, that may be ideal. For those who aren’t comfortable with the idea of running their own businesses, traditional publishing may be a better option.

- Be skeptical of the hype. There’s a tremendous amount of hype and proselytizing around self-publishing right now. Cults of personality surround prominent self-publishing pundits, and not all the information you may find is accurate, complete, or representative. Beware of self-publishing evangelists who claim that any author can make a living by self-publishing, or who present self-publishing as the only viable (or honorable) route to success, or who spend a lot of time decrying the horrors of the traditional publishing model and insulting authors who aspire or choose to publish traditionally.

Self-publishing is an option and a choice. Like traditional publishing, it isn’t right for everyone. Which you select should depend on your abilities, your goals, and your writing, not on someone else’s word for what’s “right” or “best”. There’s only what’s right or best for you.

Bad Reasons to Choose Self-Publishing

There are good reasons to choose self-publishing. There are also bad ones.

- Because you think traditional publishers aren’t interested in new writers. This is false. Every publisher is looking for the next big thing, and they are well aware that breakout authors often come from the ranks of the previously unpublished. If you have a marketable manuscript (which really is the biggest “if” for any author), never having been published won’t prejudice your chances.

- Because someone told you that self-publishing is the best route to success. Also false. It may be the best route for some authors, but not for all, and not necessarily for you. Make your own decisions.

- Because you think it’s easier. If you just want to slap your unedited manuscript up on Amazon, self-publishing is indeed pretty easy. If you want to produce a professional product, however, there’s a lot of work involved. From hiring editors and copy editors, to procuring cover art, to marketing and promotion, you must take on the entire burden of the services that a traditional publisher would provide for you.

- Because you’re impatient. Self-publishing will get your work on the market a lot faster than traditional publishing will. But it still requires time and care to create and market a quality product. Rushing a book into the world doesn’t benefit you–or your readers.

- Because you don’t want an editor tampering with your golden prose. Every writer needs an editor. If you want your self-published book to stand out in an extremely competitive market, hiring a competent editor is one of the best investments you can make. (There’s more on editing, along with tips on vetting freelance editors, at Writer Beware’s Editors page.)

- Because you want to make a living. There’s a lot of anecdotal information floating around about authors who are making a living wage–or even getting rich–from their self-published books. These stories may be true, but they’re not representative. Bear in mind this important fact gleaned from Smashwords’ most recent sales survey: “The ebook sales power curve is extremely steep…A few titles sell fabulously well and most sell poorly.” As with traditional publishing, self-publishing is not a golden ticket, and is unlikely to make you rich. The battle against obscurity must be fought by all writers, no matter how they decide to publish.

- Because you think it will make you totally independent. Self-publishing gives you far more control than traditional publishing does. But you’re still subject to the policies and content guidelines of whatever service or platform you use. You’re only as independent as your self-publishing platform will allow you to be.

Cautions

The growth of self-publishing options has spawned an explosion of services aimed at self-publishers. Problem is, not all of them are legit.

Always check the reputations of any service or service provider you’re thinking of using. Good resources for doing that: the Bewares, Recommendations, and Background Check forum at Absolute Write, and the Kindle boards.

Scams

They’re out there. Some examples, drawn from Writer Beware’s files:

Bait and switch editing schemes, where someone posing as a reader contacts a writer about (sometimes imaginary) errors in his or her book.

Fake PR services, charging a premium for, basically, junk mail.

Conman publicists, soliciting successful self-publishers, taking the money and running.

Fake blog tour companies. One we know of took authors’ money and vanished without ever arranging the tours. Another created a closed loop: dozens of fake book blogs posting identical material.

Unqualified/inexperienced service providers

Far more common than scams, but just as bad. Like unqualified literary agents, unqualified editors, publicists, designers, and artists are often entirely well-intentioned, but just don’t have the skills to do a professional job. They may seem appealing because their fees are often lower than the professionals’, but don’t be tempted–you get what you pay for.

Always check the credentials of any service provider you’re thinking of hiring (and those of their staff). People who offer a service should have relevant work experience; a love of reading, a degree in English, or a career as a teacher doesn’t necessarily qualify someone to be an editor, for example. If you can’t find information on a provider’s background, or you request it and encounter resistance or refusal, walk away.

Look for samples of their work (book covers they’ve designed, books they’ve edited, etc.; a reputable provider should be glad to share this information). Ask for references. Plug their names into search engines to see if you can find recommendations or complaints. Check Preditors and Editors and Absolute Write.

Marketing packages

Many companies, and almost all self-publishing services, sell marketing packages. These are typically heavily based on relatively ineffective methods (“search engine-optimized” press releases, email campaigns, print and online advertisements) or things you could do yourself (setting up social media accounts, creating websites). They are rarely worth the money.

Other marketing strategies to avoid range from the pointless (posting your book and/or information about you on websites the marketer owns–the odds that such websites will get much traffic is slim) to the exploitive (offering you vanity radio spots, or interviewing you for the marketer’s own radio and TV shows–these shows are usually on public access channels or pay-to-play stations, and have tiny audiences) to the downright deceptive (claiming to pitch your book to Hollywood producers or market it to traditional publishers–this may a spam-style mass-mail approach or a listing in a catalog-style publication, but either way it will be ignored). And they can be eye-poppingly expensive. For instance, Outskirts Press (one of the larger self-publishing services) charges over $15,000 for its “Book Your Trip to Hollywood” service. AuthorHouse charges nearly $10,000 to produce a TV infomercial and book video.

Deceptive self-publishing services

Self-publishing services can be quite deceptive in the way they present themselves, implying a greater potential for success than actually exists, glossing over the challenges of self-publishing, and overstating the value of the overpriced, ineffective marketing services they sell. When evaluating self-publishing services, it’s important to remember that you are a customer purchasing a product. Sales pitches are not intended to benefit you, but to motivate you to pull out your credit card. Be skeptical of promises. Investigate before you buy.

A special case: self-publishing imprints associated with traditional publishers. These include West Bow Press (Thomas Nelson), DellArte Press (Harlequin), Balboa Press (Hay House), Archway Publishing (Simon & Schuster), LifeRich Publishing (Reader’s Digest Association), and CrossBooks (B&H Publishing).

All of these imprints emphasize their connection with their parent publishers. However, they aren’t actually run by the publishers, but by Author Solutions, the self-publishing conglomerate that also owns iUniverse, Xlibris, Trafford, AuthorHouse, and others. Writer Beware often hears from writers who believe that choosing Balboa Press will give them access to Hay House’s marketing department, or that their books will become part of Simon & Schuster’s distribution network if they use Archway Publishing. In fact, all they’re getting is an Author Solutions self-publishing package plus the glamor of a famous name.

Author Solutions itself is owned by another major publisher: Penguin Random House. Author Solutions aggressively uses the connection to promote itself, leading many authors to believe that using an Author Solutions imprint will somehow get them closer to a Big 5 publisher.

Links

Finding a Self-Publishing Service or Platform, Checking Reputations

  • Mick Rooney’s Independent Publishing Magazine provides detailed reviews of many self-publishing services and platforms, as well as news and commentary on the world of digital publishing.
  • Choosing a Self-Publishing Service is the Alliance of Independent Authors’ guide to self-publishing services and platforms; it also offers helpful advice for self-publishers. (Full disclosure: I’m one of ALLi’s advisors, and I wrote the introduction to this book. I don’t receive any remuneration or other benefit from sales.)
  • Successful novelist Piers Anthony maintains an internet publishing resource that lists and describes publishers and self-publishing services, and flags those that have problems or are the focus of complaints.
  • Preditors and Editors provides lists of publishers and self-publishing services, with “not recommended” notations to indicate those that charge fees or engage in other writer abuses.
  • E-mail Writer Beware. We’ve assembled a large archive of documentation on companies and services that engage in questionable practices. Send us the names of any company or service you’d like to know about, and we’ll summarize for you any data that’s in our files. If we have no information, we’ll let you know that too.

Self-Publishing Experts

  • The Book Designer, Joel Friedlander, offers excellent practical advice for self-publishers. Especially helpful is his e-Book Cover Design Awards, which feature and analyze successful ebook overs.
  • Author Joanna Penn offers advice on self-publishing, marketing, and writing at The Creative Penn.
  • There’s a wealth of information on publishing, self-publishing, marketing, and more at the website of hybrid author CJ Lyons: No Rules, Just Write!
  • At the Smashwords blog, Smashwords owner Mark Coker offers valuable information and commentary on the self-publishing industry.

Facts and Figures About Self-Publishing

  • Hybrid author Hugh Howey maintains the Author Earnings website , which offers a wealth of fascinating data on ebooks and self-publishing. Howey’s methods and conclusions have been widely challenged–including his heavy reliance on data scraped from Amazon–and his views of publishing and self-publishing are unapologetically biased in favor of self-publishing. Nevertheless, Author Earnings is one of the few places where facts and figures relating to self-publishing can be found.
  • In 2013, Digital Book World teamed with Writer’s Digest to survey over 9,000 published, unpublished, and self-published writers. Like Howey’s data and analysis, DBW’s has been widely challenged for bias (as has their decision to sell full survey results for nearly $300). Nevertheless, there’s interesting data here, especially since the survey looked specifically at hybrid authors (those who alternate between self-publishing and publishing traditionally). Findings are summarized in a series of articles by author and social scientist Dana Beth Weinberg.
  • In 2012, the Taleist consulting and training agency undertook a survey of more than 1,000 self-published authors, yielding valuable information on, among other things, self-publishing techniques and incomes. To get the whole survey, you’d have to buy the book–but here’s a detailed summary of the results, provided by author Catherine Ryan Howard.
  • Every year, Smashwords conducts a survey of its sales data, providing facts, figures, and trend analysis to help self-publishers make informed decisions. Here’s the latest version.

General Resources

  • The Kindle boards–news and discussion from Kindle self-publishers. This is a treasure trove of information on just about every aspect of electronic self-publishing.
  • TeleRead provides up-to-the-minute coverage of the latest news on ebooks, publishing, and self-publishing.
  • Six important questions writers should ask themselves before deciding to self-publish, from author Laekan Zea Kemp.

Links checked/Page updated: 8/1/14

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