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Eileen Gunn on SF, SFWA, and Community

Rachel Swirsky: Do you have any great stories about meeting someone at a SFWA event, or online? (And if you do, please tell them. )

Eileen Gunn: Most of my stories about SFWA events are far too scurrilous to put into print. SFWAns were not very well behaved in the Eighties and Nineties. Sit next to me at a Nebula banquet, and I might tell you some….

SFWA Joins the IAF

Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has joined the International Authors Forum, an organization of authors’ groups created to “promote and defend authors’ interests and authors’ rights” by providing these groups with an “international platform to exchange information, develop positions and provide support in authors’ rights matters.”

Presidential Statement Regarding the SFWA Bulletin

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Over the past few days, there has been much public discussion about a non-member’s petition to SFWA regarding oversight of our member publication, the Bulletin. While this petition has not been formally presented to SFWA, I have seen versions and they express concerns for something that does not and will not exist: Specifically, the editor […]

Guest Post: Why You Don’t Want to Apply to Clarion West/Clarion UCSD.

by Helena Bell

The application season for Clarion West and other Clarion (UCSD) has begun. I’ve already seen posts on twitter from past alums encouraging people to apply and telling the world what wonderful, glorious experiences they had.

I’m not going to do that. I’m going to tell you not to apply. To not go. And here are my reasons:

Guest Post: Alpha Workshop: Anthologies and Opportunities

Dragons in your pickle jar. Devils at the diner. Sentient space ships named for epic poetry. All these and more inhabit the pages of the annual Alphanthology, an illustrated collection of flash fiction by alumni of the Alpha SF/F/H Workshop for Young Writers. Alpha is a nonprofit, ten-day residential workshop for teen writers of genre fiction, held every summer in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

Tools for Writers: Stellarium

Ever wonder what the sky looked like in 1006 CE, when a supernova could be seen during the day? What dates did full moons illuminate the fog of Whitechapel as Jack the Ripper prowled the streets? When a character swims the Arctic Ocean, in a story set two thousand years in the future, what star might she use to guide her passage? Stellarium provides answers.